Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Lineker

Formula One 2018

Recommended Posts

Lineker    34,445

yolo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Lineker    34,445
2 minutes ago, Adam es Tranquilo said:

Is this the new cupset?

Obvs.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
MDK    23,371
Just now, Adam es Tranquilo said:

Is this the new cupset?

Its on fleek.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Lineker    34,445
Quote

Formula 2 title favourite and Mercedes protege George Russell has secured a Williams Formula 1 drive for the 2019 season.

The 20-year-old has signed a "multi-year agreement" with the British team but will also maintain his link to Mercedes, for which Russell has been a test and reserve driver this season.

Russell is poised to clinch the F2 title in next month's Abu Dhabi finale, having stepped up to the series this year as the reigning GP3 champion.

"It is a huge honour to join a team of Williams' prestige and heritage," said Russell.

"I would like to thank Claire [Williams] and everyone at Williams for their faith in making this decision, as well as Toto [Wolff] and the team at Mercedes for their fantastic support throughout GP3 and Formula 2.

"I am incredibly excited to start working with everyone at Grove and to take my first steps as a Formula 1 race driver.

"I cannot wait for Melbourne next year and to join Williams at what we all believe will be the start of an exciting new journey."

Russell tested for Mercedes and its customer team Force India this year but a volatile summer of driver market activity threatened the 2014 McLaren Autosport BRDC Award winner's prospects of graduating to F1.

Williams is enduring a difficult season and lies last of the 10 teams in the constructors' championship.

It has targeted Russell for several months as part of the plan to change its fortunes.

Williams was criticised earlier this year for signing Sergey Sirotkin to partner Lance Stroll.

Deputy team principal Claire Williams said it has "always tried to promote and develop young talent at Williams, and George fits that ethos perfectly".

She added: "He is already highly regarded in the paddock and a driver whose career we have been watching for a while.

"In the time we have spent with him so far, we believe that he will be a great fit for our team; his commitment, passion and dedication is exactly what we need to drive the positive momentum building at Grove as we focus on the future.

"We are extremely excited to welcome George and working with him moving forward."

Russell's appointment means it is unlikely fellow Mercedes junior Esteban Ocon will race in F1 next year.

Ocon had previously declared Williams was his last realistic option and is now poised to move into a reserve and test driver role ahead of a likely return to the grid in 2020.

The identity of Russell's 2019 team-mate is unknown, but Russian rookie Sirotkin is vying for a second season.

Sirotkin has compared well against podium finisher Stroll in qualifying, and Stroll is poised to leave the team to move to Racing Point Force India - where his father Lawrence is now a major investor.

Another Russian, Artem Markelov, has been linked to Williams, while reserve driver Robert Kubica has not given up hope of an F1 comeback either.

Three Brits on the grid next year then - Hamilton, Norris, Russell.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Adam es Tranquilo    6,975
2 minutes ago, Lineker said:

Obvs.

Im actually okay with this one.

2 minutes ago, MDK said:

Its on fleek.

I'm not okay with this.

Good to see more Brits on the grid, and especially nice to see one in a Williams. I hope the team's performance improves for next year.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Katsuya    2,842

Vandoorne and Wehrlein have now both signed for Formula E teams (HWA / Mahindra respectively), which takes them out of the Toro Rosso speculation.

RIght now, it looks like it's either Sirotkin, Hartley or Albon who will get that seat. Apparently it's now between Ocon + Kubica for the other Williams drive.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Adam es Tranquilo    6,975

I'd love to see Kubica back, but if Ocon doesnt have a seat next year it's a travesty so I'd like to see him in the Williams.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Lineker    34,445
1 minute ago, Katsuya said:

which means the top 3 from F2 are probably going to be driving in F1 next year.

The system will actually work?!! :o

Guy Edwards: not dead

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Lineker    34,445

Force India have finally confirmed Perez for 2019.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Chris2K    4,493

Vettel has a three place grid penalty after failing to slow sufficiently for a red flag in practice.

It's like he's actively sabotaging himself at this point.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Gazz    53,928

43319811_1945217562233215_89554899896197

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Liam Mk2    3,614

If they don’t have cowboy hat themed helmets then I will be disappointed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jasonmufc    5,350
3 hours ago, Liam Mk2 said:

If they don’t have cowboy hat themed helmets then I will be disappointed.

lq4DU.png

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Chris2K    4,493

At this point I think a slight breeze would turn Vettel's car around 180 degrees.

But Kimi has made up a place on the opening lap of a race at last! :w00t:

 

Ricciardo out with likely engine trouble. Bet he can't wait to get rid of those Renault engines for next ye.... oh. :facepalm:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Gazz    53,928

:huh:

Kimi is winning the WDC next year.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Chris2K    4,493

One of the fun facts to come out of this is that Kimi is the only driver to have won a race in a V6, V8 and V10 engine car.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Similar Content

    • By Lineker
      Mercedes AMG Petronas Motorsport (Mercedes)
       #44 Lewis Hamilton
       #77 Valtteri Bottas

       Red Bull Racing (Renault, TAG-Heuer branded)
       #3 Daniel Ricciardo
       #33 Max Verstappen

       Scuderia Ferrari (Ferrari)
       #5 Sebastian Vettel
       #7 Kimi Räikkönen

       Sahara Force India F1 Team (Mercedes)
       #11 Sergio Pérez
       #31 Esteban Ocon

       Williams Martini Racing (Mercedes)
       #18 Lance Stroll
       #19 Felipe Massa (Rounds 1-10, 12-) /  #40 Paul di Resta (Round 11)

       McLaren Honda Formula 1 Team (Honda)
       #2 Stoffel Vandoorne
       #14 Fernando Alonso (Rounds 1-5, 7-) /  #22 Jenson Button (Round 6)

       Scuderia Toro Rosso (Renault)
       #26 Daniil Kvyat (Rounds 1-14, 17) /  #10 Pierre Gasly (Round 15-16) /  #28 Brendon Hartley (Round 18-20)
       #55 Carlos Sainz Jr. (Round 1-16) /  #39 Brendon Hartley (Round 17) /  #10 Pierre Gasly (Round 18-20)

       Haas F1 Team (Ferrari)
       #8 Romain Grosjean
       #20 Kevin Magnussen

       Renault Sport Formula One Team (Renault)
       #27 Nico Hülkenberg
       #30 Jolyon Palmer (Round 1-16) /  #55 Carlos Sainz Jr. (Round 17-)

       Sauber F1 Team (Ferrari 061 (2016-spec))
       #9 Marcus Ericsson
       #36 Antonio Giovinazzi (Round 1-2) /  #94 Pascal Wehrlein (Round 3-)

      CALENDAR
      27th February-2nd March 2017
      Pre-Season Testing 1 (Circuit de Barcelona-Catalunya, Barcelona)
      7th-10th March 2017
       Pre-Season Testing 2 (Circuit de Barcelona-Catalunya, Barcelona)
      26th March 2017
       Round 1 - Australian Grand Prix (Melbourne Grand Prix Circuit, Melbourne)
      9th April 2017
       Round 2 - Chinese Grand Prix (Shanghai International Circuit, Shanghai)
      16th April 2017
       Round 3 - Bahrain Grand Prix (Bahrain International Circuit, Sakhir)
      30th April 2017
       Round 4 - Russian Grand Prix (Sochi Autodrom, Sochi)
      14th May 2017
       Round 5 - Spanish Grand Prix (Circuit de Barcelona-Catalunya, Barcelona)
      28th May 2017
       Round 6 - Monaco Grand Prix (Circuit de Monaco, Monte Carlo)
      11th June 2017
      Round 7 - Canadian Grand Prix (Circuit Gilles Villeneuve, Montreal)
      25th June 2017
       Round 8 - Azerbaijan Grand Prix (Baku City Circuit, Baku)
      9th July 2017
       Round 9 - Austrian Grand Prix (Red Bull Ring, Spielberg)
      16th July 2017
       Round 10 - British Grand Prix (Silverstone Circuit, Silverstone)
      30th July 2017
       Round 11 - Hungarian Grand Prix (Hungaroring, Budapest)
      27th August 2017
       Round 12 - Belgian Grand Prix (Circuit de Spa-Francorchamps, Stavelot)
      3rd September 2017
       Round 13 - Italian Grand Prix (Autodromo Nazionale Monza, Monza)
      17th September 2017
       Round 14 - Malaysian Grand Prix (Sepang International Circuit, Kuala Lumpur)
      1st October 2017
       Round 15 - Singapore Grand Prix (Marina Bay Street Circuit, Singapore)
      8th October 2017
       Round 16 - Japanese Grand Prix (Suzuka International Race Course, Suzuka)
      22nd October 2017
       Round 17 - United States Grand Prix (Circuit of the Americas, Austin, Texas)
      29th October 2017
       Round 18 - Mexican Grand Prix (Autódromo Hermanos Rodríguez, Mexico City)
      12th November 2017
       Round 19 - Brazilian Grand Prix (Autódromo José Carlos Pace, São Paulo)
      26th November 2017
       Round 20 - Abu Dhabi Grand Prix (Yas Marina Circuit, Abu Dhabi)

      GENERAL CHANGES:
      In September 2016, Liberty Media purchased a minority stake in the sport from CVC Capital Partners ahead of a hoped-for full buyout in time for the 2017 season. As part of the deal, the sport adopted a model similar to that used by the US National Football League and Major League Baseball, with teams entitled to purchase a stake in the sport As a response to widespread changes in the technical regulations expected to increase cornering speeds by up to 40 km/h (24.9 mph), the FIA requested that every circuit on the calendar undergo revisions to update safety features.
      TECHNICAL REGULATION CHANGES:
      The technical regulations governing bodywork design were revised for 2017, with the objective of improving lap times by four to five seconds over the 2016 generation of cars. These changes include: An increase of the width of the front wing to 1,800 mm (70.9 in). Lowering the rear wing by 150 mm (5.9 in) and moving its position back by 200 mm (7.9 in). The leading edge of the barge boards being brought forward to allow teams more freedom in controlling airflow. An increase of the width of the front and rear tyres to allow cars to generate more mechanical grip. The minimum weight of the car including the driver being raised by 20 kg to 722 kg, with teams allowed to use 105 kg of fuel to account for the increase in minimum weight. The token system used to regulate power unit development — where the power unit was divided into individual areas, and each area assigned a points value with development of these areas deducting points from a manufacturer's overall points quota — will be abandoned. Restrictions are to be placed on the dimensions, weight and the materials used to build each individual component of the power unit. Teams are restricted to four power units per season regardless of the number of Grands Prix in the season. Previous seasons had included a provision for a fifth power unit if the number of Grands Prix in a season exceeded 20; from 2017, this provision is to be abandoned. The cost of a power unit supply is reduced by €1 million in 2017 ahead of a further reduction in 2018. Cameras will no longer be permitted to be mounted on stalks, located on the nose of the car.
      SPORTING REGULATION CHANGES:
      Under rules introduced in 2015, grid penalties for exceeding a driver's quota of power unit components carried over from one race to the next if the penalty could not be fully served when issued. When this carry-over system was abandoned, teams could build up a reserve of spare components by introducing several at once while only serving a single grid penalty. From 2017, teams will only be able to use one new component over their quota per race, with any additional components incurring further penalties. This change prevents teams from "stockpiling" spare power unit components. Power unit suppliers will have an "obligation to supply", mandating that they supply power units to any team, should a team end up without an agreement. The rule was introduced following the breakdown in the relationship between Renault and their customer teams Red Bull Racing and Scuderia Toro Rosso at the end of the 2015 season that left both teams in limbo until deals could be arranged. In the event that a race is declared wet and must start behind the safety car, the grid will follow normal starting procedures once conditions are declared satisfactory for racing. Drivers will line up on the grid for a standing start once the safety car pulls into pit lane, although any laps completed behind the safety car will count towards the total race distance.
    • By Jasonmufc
      Mercedes AMG Petronas F1 Team (Mercedes)
       #44 Lewis Hamilton
       #6 Nico Rosberg

       Scuderia Ferrari (Ferrari)
       #5 Sebastian Vettel
       #7 Kimi Räikkönen
       
       Williams Martini Racing (Mercedes)
       #19 Felipe Massa
       #77 Valtteri Bottas
       
       Red Bull Racing (Renault, TAG-Heuer branded)
       #3 Daniel Ricciardo
       #26 Daniil Kvyat (Round 1-4) /  #33 Max Verstappen (Round 5-21)
       Sahara Force India F1 Team (Mercedes)
       #11 Sergio Pérez
       #27 Nico Hülkenberg
       
       Renault Sport F1 Team (Renault)
       #20 Kevin Magnussen
       #30 Jolyon Palmer
       
       Scuderia Toro Rosso (Ferrari 0594/4, 2015 spec)
       #33 Max Verstappen (Round 1-4) /  #26 Daniil Kvyat (Round 5-21)
       #55 Carlos Sainz, Jr.
       Sauber F1 Team (Ferrari)
       #9 Marcus Ericsson
       #12 Felipe Nasr
       
       McLaren Honda (Honda)
       #14 Fernando Alonso (Round 1, 3-21) /  #47 Stoffel Vandoorne (Round 2)
       #22 Jenson Button
       
       Manor Racing MRT (Mercedes)
       #88 Rio Haryanto (Round 1-12) /   #31 Esteban Ocon (Round 13-)
       #94 Pascal Wehrlein
       Haas F1 Team (Ferrari)
       #8 Romain Grosjean
       #21 Esteban Gutiérrez
      CALENDAR
      22th-25th February 2016
      Pre-Season Testing 1 - (Circuit de Barcelona-Catalunya, Barcelona)
      1st-4th March 2016
       Pre-Season Testing 2 - (Circuit de Barcelona-Catalunya, Barcelona)
      20th March 2016
       Round 1 - Australian Grand Prix (Melbourne Grand Prix Circuit, Melbourne)
      3rd April 2016
       Round 2 - Bahrain Grand Prix (Bahrain International Circuit, Sakhir)
      17th April 2016
       Round 3 - Chinese Grand Prix (Shanghai International Circuit, Shanghai)
      1st May 2016
       Round 4 - Russian Grand Prix (Sochi Autodrom, Sochi)
      15th May 2016
       Round 5 - Spanish Grand Prix (Circuit de Barcelona-Catalunya, Barcelona)
      29th May 2016
       Round 6 - Monaco Grand Prix (Circuit de Monaco, Monte Carlo)
      12th June 2016
       Round 7 - Canadian Grand Prix (Circuit Gilles Villeneuve, Montreal)
      19th June 2016
       Round 8 - Grand Prix of Europe (Baku City Circuit, Baku, Azerbaijan)
      3rd July 2016
       Round 9 - Austrian Grand Prix (Red Bull Ring, Spielberg)
      10th July 2016
       Round 10 - British Grand Prix (Silverstone Circuit, Silverstone)
      24th July 2016
       Round 11 - Hungarian Grand Prix (Hungaroring, Budapest)
      31th July 2016
       Round 12 - German Grand Prix (Hockenheimring, Hockenheim)
      28th August 2016
       Round 13 - Belgian Grand Prix (Circuit de Spa-Francorchamps, Stavelot)
      4th September 2016
       Round 14 - Italian Grand Prix (Autodromo Nazionale Monza, Monza)
      18th September 2016
       Round 15 - Singapore Grand Prix (Marina Bay Street Circuit, Singapore)
      2nd October 2016
       Round 16 - Malaysian Grand Prix (Sepang International Circuit, Kuala Lumpur)
      9th October 2016
       Round 17 - Japanese Grand Prix (Suzuka Circuit, Suzuka)
      23rd October 2016
       Round 18 - United States Grand Prix (Circuit of the Americas, Austin, Texas)
      30th October 2016
       Round 19 - Mexican Grand Prix (Autódromo Hermanos Rodríguez, Mexico City)
      13th November 2016
       Round 20 - Brazilian Grand Prix (Autódromo José Carlos Pace, São Paulo)
      27th November 2016
       Round 21 - Abu Dhabi Grand Prix - (Yas Marina Circuit, Abu Dhabi)

      General changes:
      The FIA and Formula One Management will be granted greater power to change the Sporting and Technical Regulations and to make decisions affecting the governance of the sport. Technical Regulation changes:
      Cars were required to be designed with a separate wastegate for exhaust gases to pass through in a bid to increase the noise of the cars following criticism since the introduction of the 2014 generation of engines. Tyre supplier Pirelli introduced a fifth tyre compound known as "ultrasoft", with the manufacturer stating that they would only be available on street circuits. Pirelli changed their approach to tyre supply in 2016, bringing three dry compounds to races instead of two. The compounds are made public two weeks before each event. Pirelli assigns two "choice" compounds, and a third set (the softest available regardless of Pirelli's selection) are given to teams reaching Q3. Drivers select their remaining ten tyre sets for the event between the three compounds and must use two dry compounds during the race, provided that at least one set is from the Pirelli "choice" selection. The FIA has opted to increase the number of tokens available for power unit development starting in 2016. While the initial plans would have given manufacturers fifteen tokens for the season, the number was raised to thirty-two, the same number as 2014, in order to allow struggling manufacturers such as Renault and Honda to improve their development. This decision also allows further development on parts that were initially planned to be closed off, including the upper and lower crankcase, valve drive, crankshaft, air-valve system and ancillaries drive. Sporting Regulation changes:
      Starting in 2016, the number of pre-season tests were reduced from three to two. The FIA formally increased the maximum events allowed in a season from 20 to 21 to accommodate the calendar's approval. The stewards are given greater powers in enforcing track limits, with drivers required to stay between the white lines marking the edges of the circuit, except in cases of driver error. The change was introduced after an investigation by Pirelli into Sebastian Vettel's high-speed blow-out at the 2015 Belgian Grand Prix that concluded that Vettel's off-track excursions had been a significant factor in the incident. The FIA is also exploring a number of solutions to discourage drivers from abusing track limits and aid in their policing, including GPS tracking, the reprofiling of kerbs, the installation of pressure-sensitive sensors and the use of high-speed cameras. Any driver who causes the start of the race to be aborted will be required to start the race from pit lane at the restart. The procedure for issuing gearbox penalties will be amended so that penalties are applied in the order that they are awarded, bringing the system in line with the wider grid penalty system. The Virtual Safety Car system is to be used in practice sessions as well to avoid the unnecessary use of red flags and session stoppages. The drag reduction system, which is deactivated when under Virtual Safety Car periods and full-course yellow flags, is to be available as soon as a Virtual Safety Car period has ended; drivers previously had to wait two laps before the system was reactivated. The qualifying process was heavily revised two weeks before the season began. The three-period format first introduced in 2006 was retained, but with a progressive "knock-out" style of elimination. Despite widespread criticism of the format at the season-opening Australian Grand Prix, and a vote from the teams to revert to the pre-2016 format, the FIA's F1 Commission chose to maintain the system ahead of a full review later in the season. The stewards' powers to monitor pit-to-car communications were broadened for the 2016 season, with race control able to monitor the radio feeds for each driver in real time and consult with engineering advisors to further monitor the content in a bid to crack down on driver coaching and the use of coded messages. The process new drivers go through in order to qualify for a superlicence will be changed, with additional restrictions put in place as part of the wider FIA Global Pathway. The changes were introduced following controversy surrounding Max Verstappen qualifying for a superlicence at the age of 16 after a single season competing in European Formula 3.
    • By Lineker
      Mercedes AMG Petronas F1 Team (Mercedes)
       #44 Lewis Hamilton
       #6 Nico Rosberg
       
       Infiniti Red Bull Racing (Renault)
       #3 Daniel Ricciardo
       #26 Daniil Kvyat
       
       Williams Martini Racing (Mercedes)
       #19 Felipe Massa
       #77 Valtteri Bottas
       
       Scuderia Ferrari (Ferrari)
       #5 Sebastian Vettel
       #7 Kimi Räikkönen
       
       McLaren Honda (Honda)
       #20 Kevin Magnussen (Round 1) / #14 Fernando Alonso (Rounds 2-19)
       #22 Jenson Button
       
       Sahara Force India F1 Team (Mercedes)
       #11 Sergio Pérez
       #27 Nico Hülkenberg
       
       Scuderia Toro Rosso (Renault)
       #33 Max Verstappen
       #55 Carlos Sainz, Jr.
       
       Lotus F1 Team (Mercedes)
       #8 Romain Grosjean
       #13 Pastor Maldonado
       
       Manor Marussia F1 Team (Ferrari 059/3 (2014-spec))
       #28 Will Stevens
       #98 Roberto Merhi (Rounds 1-12, 15, 19) /  #53 Alexander Rossi (Rounds 13-14, 16-18)
         Sauber F1 Team (Ferrari)
       #9 Marcus Ericsson
       #12 Felipe Nasr
       
      CALENDAR

      15th March 2015
       Round 1 - Australian Grand Prix (Melbourne Grand Prix Circuit, Melbourne)
       
      29th March 2015
       Round 2 - Malaysian Grand Prix (Sepang International Circuit, Kuala Lumpur)
       
      12th April 2015
       Round 3 - Chinese Grand Prix (Shanghai International Circuit, Shanghai)
       
      19th April 2015
       Round 4 - Bahrain Grand Prix (Bahrain International Circuit, Sakhir)
       
      10th May 2015
       Round 5 - Spanish Grand Prix (Circuit de Barcelona-Catalunya, Barcelona)
       
      24th May 2015
       Round 6 - Monaco Grand Prix (Circuit de Monaco, Monte Carlo)
       
      7th June 2015
       Round 7 - Canadian Grand Prix (Circuit Gilles Villeneuve, Montreal)
       
      21st June 2015
       Round 8 - Austrian Grand Prix (Red Bull Ring, Spielberg)
       
      5th July 2015
       Round 9 - British Grand Prix (Silverstone Circuit, Silverstone)
       
      26th July 2015
       Round 10 - Hungarian Grand Prix (Hungaroring, Budapest)
       
      23rd August 2015
       Round 11 - Belgian Grand Prix (Circuit de Spa-Francorchamps, Stavelot)
       
      6th September 2015
       Round 12 - Italian Grand Prix (Autodromo Nazionale Monza, Monza)
       
      20th September 2015
       Round 13 - Singapore Grand Prix (Marina Bay Street Circuit, Singapore)
       
      27th September 2015
       Round 14 - Japanese Grand Prix (Suzuka Circuit, Suzuka)
       
      11th October 2015
       Round 15 - Russian Grand Prix (Sochi Autodrom, Sochi)
       
      25th October 2015
       Round 16 - United States Grand Prix (Circuit of the Americas, Austin, Texas)
       
      1st November 2015
       Round 17 - Mexican Grand Prix (Autódromo Hermanos Rodríguez, Mexico City)
       
      15th November 2015
       Round 18 - Brazilian Grand Prix (Autódromo José Carlos Pace, São Paulo)
       
      29th November 2015
       Round 19 - Abu Dhabi Grand Prix - (Yas Marina Circuit, Abu Dhabi)
       
      REGULATION CHANGES - TECHNICAL
      The number of power units that a driver may use in a season will be reduced from five in 2014 to four in 2015. The rules regarding engine development that were introduced in 2014 will change, with the manufacturers allowed to perform half the development permitted in 2014; the development will be halved again in 2016. Following the backlash over "ugly" nose designs in 2014, the FIA moved to amend the rules surrounding nose designs for the 2015 season. Noses will now be lower than in 2014, retaining a minimum cross section, but they must taper to a point at a fixed linear rate, effectively outlawing the dramatic finger shapes seen in 2014 in favour of a more gradual shape. Furthermore, the design of the nose must be symmetrical and consistent with the centreline of the car, thereby banning the more exotic designs, such as the "twin-tusk" approach used by Lotus on the E22 chassis. The minimum weight of the cars at all times during an event was increased to 702 kilograms (1,548 lb). The ban on Front-and-Rear Interconnected suspension systems (FRIC) implemented in the middle of the 2014 season was formalised, with the regulations stating that the front and rear suspension must be designed in such a way that any change in performance must be a direct result of a change in load applied solely to them. The anti-intrusion panels on both sides of the survival cell have been extended upwards to the rim of the cockpit and alongside the driver's head. Following the financial struggles faced by Marussia and Caterham in 2014, the FIA approved the use of 2014-specification chassis in 2015 provided that teams showed cause and received an individual dispensation to compete with their old chassis. However a request by Manor F1 to use their 2014 car was later rejected by the other teams. Subsequent regulation changes allowed the team to use the 2014 model of Ferrari power units in their 2015 chassis instead of the 2015 specification power units used by Ferrari and other customer teams. REGULATION CHANGES - SPORTING
      The replacement of a complete power unit will no longer result in a penalty. Instead, penalties will be applied cumulatively for individual components of the power unit. If such a grid place penalty is imposed and the driver's grid position is such that the full penalty cannot be applied, then the remainder of the penalty will no longer be carried over to the next race, but will instead be applied in the form of a time penalty during the race corresponding to the number of grid spaces remaining in the penalty. In addition to the existing five-second penalty that may be served during a driver's scheduled pit stop, a new ten-second penalty that will have to be served in the same manner, will be introduced. If a car is deemed to have been released from its pit stop in an unsafe manner, the driver will receive a ten second stop-and-go penalty. Further penalties will be applied if the stewards believe that the driver is aware of this and attempts to drive the car regardless. The qualifying procedure has been further clarified to cater to different sizes of starting grids: if twenty-four cars are entered for the race, seven will be eliminated after the each of the first two qualifying segments; if twenty-two are entered, six will be eliminated after each qualifying segment and so on if fewer cars are eligible. The partial ban on pit-to-car communication introduced at the 2014 Singapore Grand Prix will be extended to include a blanket ban on sharing technical data between team and driver, such as specific fuel consumption settings. Double points will no longer be awarded at the final event of the championship. In light of a regulation introduced in 2014 dictating that a race can not run for more than four hours and following recommendations from the report into Jules Bianchi's accident at the 2014 Japanese Grand Prix, the start times of five Grands Prix have been brought forward by one hour, so that races do not start with less than four hours until dusk. Thus, the Australian, Malaysia, Chinese, Japanese and Russian Grands Prix will start an hour earlier than in 2014. In the aftermath of Bianchi's accident, a new procedure called virtual safety car (VSC) will be introduced, obliging drivers to reduce their speed to match the one indicated on their displays on their steering wheels. The procedure may be initiated when double waved yellow flags are needed on any section of a circuit where competitors and officials may be in danger, but the circumstances are not as such to warrant deployment of the actual safety car. The safety car procedure was amended. Once the last lapped car has passed the leader, the safety car will return to the pits at the end of the following lap. This is a change of the previous practice which required the unlapped cars to have caught up with the back of the pack before the safety car could return to the pits. If a race is suspended, the cars will no longer line up on the grid but will slowly proceed to the pit lane instead. Pit exit will be closed and the first car to arrive in the pit lane will proceed to the exit with the other lining up behind the first one. If any team personnel or team equipment remain on the grid after the fifteen-second signal has been shown before the start of the formation lap, the driver of the car concerned must start the race from the pit lane. If the driver concerned fails to obey this, they will receive a ten second stop-and-go penalty. Drivers are no longer permitted to change the design of their helmet in-season.
    • By Lineker
      Infiniti Red Bull Racing (Renault) #1 - Sebastian Vettel #2 - Mark Webber Scuderia Ferrari (Ferrari) #3 - Fernando Alonso #4 - Felipe Massa Vodafone McLaren Mercedes (Mercedes) #5 - Jenson Button #6 - Sergio Pérez Lotus F1 Team (Renault) #7 - Kimi Räikkönen (Round 1-17) / Heikki Kovalainen (Round 18-19) #8 - Romain Grosjean Mercedes AMG Petronas F1 Team (Mercedes) #9 - Nico Rosberg #10 - Lewis Hamilton Sauber F1 Team (Ferrari) #11 - Nico Hülkenberg #12 - Esteban Gutiérrez Sahara Force India F1 Team (Mercedes) #14 - Paul di Resta #15 - TBA Williams F1 (Renault) #16 - Pastor Maldonado #17 - - Valtteri Bottas Scuderia Toro Rosso (Ferrari) #18 - Daniel Ricciardo #19 - Jean-Éric Vergne Caterham F1 Team (Renault) #20 - Charles Pic #21 - TBA Marussia F1 Team (Cosworth) #22 - Timo Glock #23 - Max Chilton
      Rule Changes from 2012 Sporting regulations At the June 2012 meeting of the World Motor Sport Council, the FIA announced plans to introduce cost-control measures for the 2013 season, which would be policed by the FIA pending the agreement of the teams. This follows a failed attempt by former FIA President Max Mosley to introduce a budget cap for the 2010 season, and the withdrawal of Ferrari, Torro Rosso, Sauber and Red Bull from the Formula One Teams Association in December 2011 over the implementation of the Resource Restriction Agreement, a voluntary agreement between teams to limit costs in the sport. Following HRT's omission from the provisional entry list, the grid was reduced to twenty-two cars, prompting a change to qualifying procedures. With twenty-two cars on the grid, six cars – instead of seven – will be eliminated during the first period of qualifying, with six more eliminated at the end of the second period. The third qualifying period remains unchanged, with the ten fastest drivers all advancing to the final ten minutes of qualifying. The rules governing the use of the Drag Reduction System (DRS) will be altered. Where drivers were free to use the system at will during free practice and qualifying, from 2013, the use of DRS will be restricted to the designated DRS zone in a bid to improve safety. In response to this, the FIA announced plans to include two DRS zones at every circuit on the 2013 calendar where it was feasible to do so. The FIA is seeking to remove the rules of "force majeure" to clarify scrutineering procedures. Under the rules of force majeure, cars must be able to return to the pits under their own power during qualifying or else risk exclusion from the results. However, if a team can adequately demonstrate that circumstances beyond their control forced them to stop a car on the circuit before it could return to the pits, then the rules of force majeure dicatate that the team and driver in question are exempt from any exclusion. Under new regulations, force majeure would no longer be recognised as a valid reason for stopping a car. These changes were first proposed in the aftermath of the 2012 Abu Dhabi Grand Prix, when Red Bull Racing instructed Sebastian Vettel to stop on the circuit after qualifying. Although race stewards initially accepted the team's explanation that the order came because of an imminent technical fault that threatened lasting damage to Vettel's engine, it was later discovered that Vettel had insufficient fuel in his car at the time and had been ordered to pull over so as to preserve the mandatory one litre sample required for testing at the end of qualifying. As a result, Vettel was excluded from the results, and the changes to force majeure were put forward. Following a crackdown on driving standard by race stewards in 2012, the FIA has sought to introduce a "penalty points" system of enforcing driving standards modelled on the points system used for road-going drivers' licences worldwide. Under the system, driving infringements would be assigned a points value that would be deducted from a driver's Super Licence when they commit an infraction. When a driver accumulates a pre-determined number of points, they face an automatic ban from racing. The practice of mid-season testing, which returned to Formula One in 2012 after having been banned in 2009, will be discontinued in 2013 as part of cost-cutting initiatives. Teams will be faced with an increased entry fee for the season. Whereas entry fees had previously been fixed at €309,000 (USD$396,637) for all teams, from 2013, entry fees will be based on the World Championship points a team scored during the previous season. Teams will now pay a basic entry fee of USD$500,000 (€389,525), plus USD$5,000 (€3,895) per point scored. The reigning Constructors' champions will pay at a premium rate of USD$6,000 (€4,614) per point scored. With a final tally of 460 points, Red Bull Racing were presented with an entry fee of USD$3,260,000 (€2,507,091). Technical regulations Changes to the rules in 2012 resulted in the development of a "platypus" nose, with teams designing cars with a visible change in height along the nose assembly of the car. The design attracted criticism, with Red Bull Racing driver Mark Webber labelling the cars "ugly" and Ferrari team principal Stefano Domenicali calling them "not that pretty". At the 2012 Australian Grand Prix, Charlie Whiting, the FIA technical delegate, announced that although the changes to the sporting regulations planned for the 2014 season would effectively remove the "platypus" effect, the sport's governing body is planning to phase the stepped nose out for 2013. The FIA later accepted a proposal that would allow teams to cover up the stepped nose with a "modesty plate", a panel designed to obscure the step without fundamentally altering the aerodynamic profile of the car or offering any aerodynamic gain itself. The FIA will completely overhaul testing procedures for front wings in 2013, introducing a more-comprehensive and strenuous series of tests designed to root out the practice of exploiting flexible bodywork regulations. The "double-DRS" system, first developed by Mercedes for the W03 in 2012 will be banned in 2013. The device, which used a series of channels that ran through the car to create a stalling effect over the front wing when the rear wing Drag Reduction System was open, thereby cancelling out the downforce generated under normal conditions, would allow the car to achieve a higher top speed and better stability in fast corners. The system was the subject of several legal challenges early in the 2012 season, and rival team Lotus developed a similar system of their own before teams agreed to a ban in July 2012. However, while the regulations specifically banned the system developed by Mercedes, they make no provision for the variant developed by Lotus. Other changes The Sixth Concorde Agreement – the contract between the Fédération Internationale de l'Automobile (FIA), the Formula One teams and the Formula One Administration which dictates the terms by which the teams compete in races and take their share of the television revenues and prize money – which was first ratified by teams in 2009 expires at the end of 2012, necessitating the creation of the Seventh Concorde Agreement. As part of the renewed Agreement, the commercial rights to the sport were to be floated on the Singapore Stock Exchange; however, in June 2012 the planned floatation was delayed, with weak markets, uncertainty within Europe over the continent's economic future, and Facebook's disappointing IPO cited as reasons for the delay. The sport's decision-making process will be restructured. Prior to 2013, any decision to change the sporting or technical regulations required the agreement of at least 70% (or nine votes) of the teams in order for those changes to be accepted. From 2013 onwards, those changes will only need a 51% majority (seven teams) in order to be approved. The Technical and Sporting Working Groups, the committees responsible for deciding upon the technical and sporting regulations, will also be disbanded in favour of a "Strategy Working Group" that will oversee both technical and sporting regulations and will be made up of representatives from each of the teams that scored points in the previous season's championship, the FIA, Formula One Management, one engine supplier and six event promoters. FIA President Jean Todt described the changes as necessary and designed to give each of the stakeholders in the sport a proportionate representation in deciding the future of Formula One.
    • By Lineker
      Infiniti Red Bull Racing (Renault)
      #1 Sebastian Vettel
      #3 Daniel Ricciardo


      Mercedes AMG Petronas F1 Team (Mercedes)
      #44 Lewis Hamilton
      #6 Nico Rosberg


      Scuderia Ferrari (Ferrari)
      #14 Fernando Alonson
      #7 Kimi Räikkönen


      Lotus F1 Team (Renault)
      #8 Romain Grosjean
      #13 Pastor Maldonado


      McLaren Mercedes (Mercedes)
      #22 Jenson Button
      #20 Kevin Magnussen


      Sahara Force India F1 Team (Mercedes)
      #27 Nico Hülkenberg
      #11 Sergio Pérez


      Sauber F1 Team (Ferrari)
      #99 Adrian Sutil
      #21 Esteban Gutiérrez


      Scuderia Toro Rosso (Renault)
      #25 Jean-Éric Vergne
      #26 Daniil Kvyat


      Williams F1 Team (Mercedes)
      #19 Felipe Massa
      #77 Valtteri Bottas


      Marussia F1 Team (Ferrari)
      #17 Jules Bianchi (Round 1-15)
      #4 Max Chilton (Round 1-16)


      Caterham F1 Team (Renault)
      #9 Marcus Ericsson (Round 1-16) / #46 Will Stevens (Round 19)
      #10 Kamui Kobayashi (Round 1-11, 13-16, 19) / #45 André Lotterer (Round 12)
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.


×

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. To learn more, see our Privacy Policy