Jump to content

Formula One 2020


Recommended Posts

  • Replies 579
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

First day at school.

No one should be given a knighthood tbh.

It's an interesting conundrum, and one that hasn't shown up in F1 in literal decades. Because despite Lance being a damn decent driver, he's just that... decent, a guy that you'd sooner see in a Haas

2 hours ago, Chris2K said:

The halo must have saved him from the barrier probably going... through him, for want of a better term, in the same way it split the car in half. It looks like he had to unstrap and escape behind him through the hole that used the other half of the car.

I don't know if that barrier is getting fixed any time soon, if at all today.

unknown.png

Definitely would've been decapitated if the halo hadn't been there to shear through the barrier.

Just wild that all that force didn't do anything to ding up the halo, there's only a small crack on the safety structure highlighted in blue.

Romain has been sent to the hospital for a health check and a suspected busted rib, but honestly it's mindblowing how safe the cars are.

Metal barriers need to gtfo though, the fence caught the front but ended up ripping off the rear and causing the reinforced fuel tank to go. There's no reason they can't use tecpro which is a lot safer in catching a car.

 

Edited by Jasonmufc
  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote

As the drivers and Pirelli continue to trade comments over the proposed compounds for 2021, Lewis Hamilton admits that he craves the days of the tyre wars.

In an astonishing attack on Pirelli and its 2021 tyres following Friday's practice sessions, the world champion admitted disbelief that after all this time the Italian manufacturer is still unable to 'get it right'.

The Briton wasn't alone in his thoughts on the 2021 compounds, with most of his his colleagues claiming the tyres were only good for one lap, if that.

Pirelli responded by saying that the drivers were overreacting and that the tyres would come into their own once used in conjunction with the 2021 cars.

However, the 2021 cars will essentially be the 2020 cars, albeit with a limited number of changes, while Pirelli, rather than sticking with the current tyres - which are themselves the 2019 compounds - has tweaked its range.

For some time drivers and fans alike have called for a return to the days of tyre wars, when the manufacturers - like the teams and engine manufacturers - would push one another in the battle for supremacy.

While this could mean a situation similar to that witnessed during the last 'war', where one make of tyres suited a particular circuit more than its rival, drivers and fans argued that this was a small price to pay.

However, as with all wars, the battle for supremacy means continual development, which means money, the last thing the sport wants at a time it is seeking to reduce spending.

Nonetheless, speaking ahead of a race which once again could be dictated by tyre strategy more than any other single factor, Hamilton admits he years for the days of the tyre war.

Asked if there has been pressure applied to Pirelli since Friday's running, and if he feels the current (2019) tyres should be used again, Hamilton said: "The problem is for me is that I... I mentioned it yesterday... I see all the guys from Pirelli and I really have so much respect for the guys here. I think I've got a good relationship with the majority of them.

"It's difficult for us drivers to say..." he continued, "we try to be constructive, we try to be supportive in the back and nothing changes. And then even when we say something not too positive in the media nothing changes so... I do miss the tyre war that used to happen in Formula 1.

"I think with that it's great," he added. "When you don't have any competition you've got no one to base yourself on. Just imagine us as a team or for Max and his team and none of us were here, they wouldn't develop as they do now because they're chasing and competing against other people.

"Formula 1 needs to do something different in the future and that's something we need to do."

"There's not much more to add," agreed teammate, Valtteri Bottas. "Obviously our understanding with the new tyres, the main difference was in terms of reliability. So they got a lot heavier, like just because there's more material to try and prevent any punctures or failures that we had, which is an important thing, but then on the other hand, the performance was not quite there, as expected.

"So quite a bit slower and not that nice feeling to drive," he admitted. "I wasn't a big fan of those tyres, personally, but obviously... I don't know who decides in the end what tyres we're going to be using next year but we'll see."

"I think it's important that we discuss these things," said Max Verstappen, "I think that's the most important... we just have to talk to Pirelli and I hope they also listen a bit to the drivers.

"We anyway are cutting the downforce with the floor, right," he continued, "so I think naturally the pressure on the tyres will be a bit less.

"I mean with the pressure we run in the tyres anyway it's almost like a balloon, so I don't think you can go much higher so I don't think we need...

"If they would be faster then yeah, great, amazing," he laughed, "but I don't think they, are and of course the cars are not fully set up for these tyres, but honestly, the difference we had yesterday in practice is not set-up. Like you can adjust a few things but if the tyre is not turning, it's not working, then you can turn the car upside, it's not going to be the same speed.

"I hope we will not use them," he admitted, "but let's see. Was that an honest answer?"

"Can I just say that the tyre that we do have right now it's been a really good tyre, it really has," added Hamilton. "It's been the best tyre that Pirelli has given us apart from that hyper or ultra or whatever it was, the hypersoft, which was a good compound for one lap, it was pretty awesome.

"I'm personally happy to continue with the tyre that we have. Of course we would want more grip moving forwards but that's definitely not what we've been given so far."

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I disagree with the tyre wars. I don't want to go back to the days where the tyres are perfect for 100 laps, as what is the point? It's about finding balance, which was the whole point of only having one tyre manufacturer. If you go back to the old days of more than one, it's a race to see whose tyres will never degrade.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Of course the drivers want more grip and perfect tyres, but that's not what the sport needs, it's gonna be an endless narrative forever where the drivers will never be satisfied.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Some of the more interesting moments this season have come as a result of tyre problems. Drivers have to manage the tyres and teams have to build a chassis that won’t grind them down. If they can’t do that, then I guess that’s on them.

If anything I’d like to see the tyres made less durable to force  more two-stop strategies.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I did enjoy the tyre wars in the 90s between Goodyear and Bridgestone, and to a lesser-extent the Bridgestone/Michelin days of the 2000s. Pirelli really can just coast by without anyone to challenge them which doesn't seem to have helped.

If they were going to change anything though I'd like it to be to simply make all 5 compounds of tyres available to everyone for every race, and make the teams have to figure out which strategy is going to be the best. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
23 minutes ago, Chris2K said:

Pirelli really can just coast by without anyone to challenge them which doesn't seem to have helped.

It's often said that Pirelli can make a perfect slick racing tyre that can last race distances and give people phenomenal grip, but nobody (who is dictating the rules Pirelli has to live by) wants that. I still remember when Nico Rosberg swapped tyres on the second lap at Sochi after bricking his first set on the first lap, and he finished the race without any issues at the end.

We've had years where the tyres failed in epic fashions (2013), to tyres being excessively hardy and drivers being able to finish races after pitting on the second lap (2014).

Pirelli is in an enviable no-win situation where their entire reputation gets staked in the tyres, whilst the FIA/FOM gets to dictate what they want from the tyres. They either overengineer it and people moan that there's no excitement in tyre strategy, or they create too many artificial cliffs and issues and people moan that the tyres are too erratic and drivers have to manage too much.

Either way, Pirelli gets the stick for it in the end. And what we've seen in the past decade is that tyres tend to flip flop between seasons where they're too hardy and seasons where they're too flimsy, because making the 'perfect tyre for racing' (rather than the perfect racing tyre) is a nigh impossible job.

I think a tyre war would only result in the competitors first creating the ultimate racing tyre that can last multiple race distances, and have primo grip.

I think in the end, it will only complicate matters and not really bring the results that race fans want, because the interests of tyre manufacturers and racing teams are very much the hard opposite of what race fans want. Every team would settle for a boring 1-2 like Mercedes has been doing for over half a decade now.

Also, it creates the potential issue of 'tyre works teams', where a team like Mercedes gets a Michelin deal and they get to dictate how the tyre needs to be built for their racing platform, and all the smaller customer teams have to simply work with those tyres that'll work perfectly on a Mercedes only.

 

Edited by Jasonmufc
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Jasonmufc said:

Also, it creates the potential issue of 'tyre works teams', where a team like Mercedes gets a Michelin deal and they get to dictate how the tyre needs to be built for their racing platform, and all the smaller customer teams have to simply work with those tyres that'll work perfectly on a Mercedes only.

That's essentially what happened with Ferrari and Bridgestone for most of the 2000s, which I expect prompted so many teams to jump to Michelin. But hey, if that hadn't happened, Tiago Monteiro wouldn't have a podium to his name.

Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Chris2K said:

If they were going to change anything though I'd like it to be to simply make all 5 compounds of tyres available to everyone for every race, and make the teams have to figure out which strategy is going to be the best. 

We had this until very recently. However it was very unnecessarily costly to transport all those extra tyres to each race (five dry compounds + inters + wets), and also it was deemed too confusing to less hardcore fans (i.e. the "casual viewer").

Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote

Brazilian racer Pietro Fittipaldi will make his Formula 1 debut in this weekend’s Sakhir Grand Prix, subbing in for Romain Grosjean who sustained injuries in a big crash in Bahrain on Sunday.

Haas Team Principal Guenther Steiner visited Grosjean in hospital on Monday and said afterwards that they decided to give the Frenchman “at least one race” off to recover, with the Frenchman dealing with burns to his hands.

Fittipaldi – the grandson of two-time F1 champion Emerson Fittipaldi - is Haas's current reserve driver, and has attended the majority of F1 races this season with the team.

In that role, the 24-year-old has previously tested the 2018 and 2019 car, but he’ll get his first taste of the 2020 machine when he gets behind the wheel in practice on Friday.

“After it was decided that the best thing for Romain (Grosjean) was to skip at least one race, the choice to put Pietro (Fittipaldi) in the car was pretty easy,” said Steiner.

“Pietro will drive the VF-20 and he’s familiar with us having been around the team for the past two seasons as a test and reserve driver. It’s the right thing to do and it’s obviously a good opportunity for him.

“He’s been patient and was always prepared for this opportunity – and now it has come. That’s why we want him in the car and I’m sure he’ll do a good job. It’s very demanding being called in at the last minute, but as I said, I think it’s the right thing to do for Haas F1 Team.”

Fittipaldi added: “Most importantly I’m happy Romain is safe and healthy. We’re all very happy his injuries are relatively minor after such a huge incident.

“Obviously, it’s not an ideal set of circumstances to get my first opportunity to compete in Formula 1, but I’m extremely grateful to Gene Haas and Guenther Steiner for their faith in putting me behind the wheel this weekend.

“I’ve been with the team a lot this season, both trackside and working on simulator sessions, so I’m familiar with the team’s operating procedures on a grand prix weekend. It’s going to be exciting to make my first career start in Formula 1 – I’ll be giving it my all and I look forward to starting in free practice on Friday in Bahrain.”

Fittipaldi began racing single seaters in 2013 after getting his start in karts. He won the Formula V8 3.5 Championship in 2017 with six wins, 10 podiums, and a series-record 10 pole positions before his career took him to Indycar, Endurance racing and - in 2019 - to the DTM.

He has made seven test appearances for Haas since 2018, the most recent of which was 2019's young driver test in Abu Dhabi.

He'll be the fourth member of the Fittipaldi family to race in F1 after grandfather Emerson (1970-1980, 144 starts), Emerson's brother Wilson (1972-1975, 35 starts), and Wilson's son Christian (1992-1994, 40 starts). No other family has produced as many F1 drivers.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I came here to give the stat about him being the fourth Fittipaldi, stupid last paragraph <_<. I'll still point out they were previously (and I guess still are until Sunday) tied with the Villeneuves and the Brabhams on 3.

Despite him being the fourth it's a weird mix so that it can't be said that "three generations" have raced. Emerson did, Pietro is his grandson, but Christian being Wilson's son means that the Emerson->Pietro bloodline skips a generation.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Vandoorne is their reserve driver. They’ve confirmed he will travel to Bahrain after his Formula E race as planned BUT they haven’t confirmed if he will be the one to replace Hamilton, saying they’ll confirm that in due course.

So still a hope for #Hulkenback.

 

Also, Haas have confirmed Mazepin for 2021 on a multi year deal.

Edited by Twist
Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, Twist said:

Vandoorne is their reserve driver. They’ve confirmed he will travel to Bahrain after his Formula E race as planned BUT they haven’t confirmed if he will be the one to replace Hamilton, saying they’ll confirm that in due course.

So still a hope for #Hulkenback.

 

Also, Haas have confirmed Mazepin for 2021 on a multi year deal.

Formula E is only in pre-season testing. First race is in January. Would be pretty cool seeing VanDoorne in the Mercedes.

Lewis being out makes this upcoming race pretty amazing to look forward to. Quite curious how he picked up Covid given the really strict guildelines most of the drivers/teams have to stick to.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I think it would be a huge positive PR move for Mercedes to go for Hulk, plus he's been driving last year's car quite a lot this year so he'll be more prepared than most...

I expect contracts and guidelines will likely scupper the chance though.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, there’s talk of George Russell standing in as well. I guess in the proviso that Williams allows him to. Would love to see what he has in the W11.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
  • Similar Content

    • By Lineker
      Mercedes-AMG Petronas Formula One Team (Mercedes)
       #44 Sir Lewis Hamilton (let's face it, it isn't not going to be him!)
       #77 Valtteri Bottas

       Red Bull Racing (Honda)
       #11 Sergio Pérez
       #33 Max Verstappen

       McLaren F1 Team (Mercedes)
       #3 Daniel Ricciardo
       #4 Lando Norris

       Aston Martin Cognizant Formula One Team (Mercedes)
       #5 Sebastian Vettel
       #18 Lance Stroll

       Alpine F1 Team (Renault)
       #14 Fernando Alonso
       #31 Esteban Ocon

       Scuderia Ferrari (Ferrari)
       #16 Charles Leclerc
       #55 Carlos Sainz Jr.

       Scuderia AlphaTauri Honda (Honda)
       #10 Pierre Gasly
       #22 Yuki Tsunoda

       Alfa Romeo Racing ORLEN (Ferrari)
       #7 Kimi Räikkönen
       #99 Antonio Giovinazzi

       Haas F1 Team (Ferrari)
       #9 Nikita Mazepin
       #47 Mick Schumacher

       Williams Racing (Mercedes)
       #6 Nicholas Latifi
       #63 George Russell

      CURRENT SCHEDULED CALENDAR
      12th March-14th March
       Pre-Season Testing (Bahrain International Circuit, Sakhir)
      28th March
       Round 1 - Bahrain Grand Prix (Bahrain International Circuit, Sakhir)
      18th April
       Round 2 - Emilia Romagna Grand Prix (Autodromo Internazionale Enzo e Dino Ferrari, Imola)
      2nd May
       Round 3 - TBA. The Vietnamese Grand Prix was dropped from the 2021 calendar because of the arrest on corruption charges of a Hanoi's People's Committee Chairman Nguyen Duc Chung, a key official responsible for organising the race.
      9th May
       Round 4 - Spanish Grand Prix (Circuit de Barcelona-Catalunya, Montmeló)
      23rd May
       Round 5 - Monaco Grand Prix (Circuit de Monaco, Monte Carlo)
      6th June
       Round 6 - Azerbaijan Grand Prix (Baku City Circuit, Baku)
      13th June
      Round 7 - Canadian Grand Prix (Circuit Gilles Villeneuve, Montréal)
      27th June
       Round 8 - French Grand Prix (Circuit Paul Ricard, Le Castellet) 
      4th July
       Round 9 - Austrian Grand Prix (Red Bull Ring, Spielberg)
      18th July
       Round 10 - British Grand Prix (Silverstone Circuit, Silverstone)
      1st August
       Round 11 - Hungarian Grand Prix (Hungaroring, Mogyoród)
      29th August
       Round 12 - Belgian Grand Prix (Circuit de Spa-Francorchamps, Stavelot)
      5th September
       Round 13 - Dutch Grand Prix (Circuit Zandvoort, Zandvoort)
      12th September
       Round 14 - Italian Grand Prix (Autodromo Nazionale di Monza, Monza)
      26th September
       Round 15 - Russian Grand Prix (Sochi Autodrom, Sochi)
      3rd October
       Round 16 - Singapore Grand Prix (Marina Bay Street Circuit, Singapore)
      10th October
       Round 17 - Japanese Grand Prix (Suzuka International Racing Course, Suzuka)
      24th October
       Round 18 - United States Grand Prix (Circuit of the Americas, Austin, Texas)
      31st October
       Round 19 - Mexico City Grand Prix (Autódromo Hermanos Rodríguez, Mexico City)
      7th November
       Round 20 - São Paulo Grand Prix (Autódromo José Carlos Pace, São Paulo)
      21st November
       Round 21 - Australian Grand Prix (Albert Park Circuit, Melbourne)
      5th December
       Round 22 - Saudi Arabian Grand Prix (Jeddah Street Circuit, Jeddah)
      12th December
       Round 23 - Abu Dhabi Grand Prix (Yas Marina Circuit, Abu Dhabi)
       
      ---

      The 2021 championship was due to introduce significant changes to the regulations, including the sport's governance and the sporting rules but these were delayed in March 2020 in response to the disruption caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. These rule changes will instead be introduced in 2022.

      FINANCIAL REGULATIONS:
      The championship is due to introduce a budget cap, with teams limited to spending a maximum of $145 million per year. Teams will be required to use more commercially available materials and to submit their annual expenditure. Some teams argued to further reduce the budget cap to $100 million, citing concerns that the long-term financial impact of the COVID-19 pandemic threatens the future of as many as four teams. Formula One managing director Ross Brawn stated that the sport's intention is to reduce the budget cap further in the coming years. The value of the budget cap is set for 21 races; each additional race increases the budget cap by $1 million, and vice versa: each race removed from the scheduled twenty-one race calendar deducts the budget cap by $1 million. However, the budget cap does not include marketing budget, driver's salary and the salaries of the team's top three executives. There will be additional restrictions put in place dictating how prize money can be spent. The cap will only apply to expenditure related to car performance, which will remain in place until 2026. In the event that a team breaks the financial regulations, the team can be penalised in a combination of three separate ways. For a procedural violation teams will be fined on a case-by-case basis. Teams can be given a range of punishments for exceeding their annual budget which include being deducted championship points, having reduced testing time, a race ban, or—for the most severe cases—disqualification from the championship. TECHNICAL REGULATIONS:
      Teams will be limited in what components can be modified for the 2021 season, with this requirement introduced to ease financial pressures on teams brought about by the COVID-19 pandemic. However, some changes will be mandated by the FIA, including adjustments to outer floor that are designed to reduce downforce levels. Teams can also apply for special dispensation to make changes, most notably in the case of McLaren who were given permission to modify their car to accommodate the switch from Renault to Mercedes engines. This prompted the FIA to introduce a token system whereby teams will be given a series of tokens which can be exchanged for the introduction of specific component upgrades. The "dual-axis steering" system developed by Mercedes in 2020 is banned starting from 2021. The dual-axis steering system allows the driver to adjust the toe of the front wheels to optimise mechanical grip by pulling or pushing on the steering wheel. SPORTING REGULATIONS:
      Teams will be required to allow a driver who has competed in fewer than two Grands Prix to replace one of their race drivers in a Friday practice session over the course of the season. Whilst these rules are intended to give a chance to more non-Formula One drivers to test a Formula One car, the wording of this rule means that teams satisfy the requirement if one of their regular drivers is in their rookie season. Following Mercedes' tyre error during the 2020 Sakhir Grand Prix, where George Russell was given front tyres allocated to Valtteri Bottas during a pit stop, the FIA has adjusted the rules on tyre usage; drivers using mixed compound sets or using sets allocated to another driver on their cars will be permitted to complete two laps before the driver must pit to correct the error before facing a penalty. Under the previous rules, drivers could be disqualified as soon as such error had occurred. The race time limit for red flagged races will also be reduced from four hours to three hours. RACE WEEKEND STRUCTURE:
      For the 2021 season the schedule of a race weekend is due to be revised. Under the pre-existing regulations a race weekend spans four days with the Thursday before the race being reserved for media and promotional events and scrutineering; however, under the new regulations all of Thursday's events will be moved to the Friday morning with the times between Friday's activities being reduced. Cars will be under parc fermé conditions following the end of free practice three instead of qualifying, further restricting teams and drivers making major changes to setups ahead of the race. The 2021 W Series for female drivers has been added to the list of support racing series alongside Formula 2, Formula 3 and Porsche Supercup. The 2021 W series season will start at Circuit Paul Ricard where it will be a support event for the French Grand Prix in late June and will end in Mexico City in late October, supporting the Mexico City Grand Prix. Formula 2 and Formula 3 will support Formula One on alternate weekends, rather than the same ones as a cost saving measure.
    • By Charlie Tango
      Not sure how popular Formula 1 games are these days, but just thought I'd pass on that the new F1 2020 game from Codemasters (to be available on PS4, Xbox & PC) will be released on 10th July. With the season currently scheduled to start on 28th June in France (although things are changing all the time in the current climate), that means the game will come out within a couple of weeks of what is intended to be the first race of the season.
      The big features are that Formula 2 will again be part of the game, better multiplayer and there will be the option to create your very own team in a new management mode, which admittedly does sound fun. There will be a 'Michael Schumacher Deluxe' edition to celebrate the great man, which will feature four of his most iconic cars (quoting from the article now) including the Jordan 191 in which he made his debut, his title-winning Benetton B194 and B195 and the Ferrari F1-2000 that took him to the first of his five titles with the Italian team.
      The only editions I've seen thus far on Amazon are for PS4, £54.99 for the 'seventy' edition and £64.99 for the Schumacher Deluxe. The Schumacher Deluxe is listed to be released three days early on 7th July. Not sure how reliable that is.
    • By Lineker
      Mercedes-AMG Petronas Motorsport (Mercedes)
       #44 Lewis Hamilton
       #77 Valtteri Bottas

       Scuderia Ferrari (Ferrari)
       #5 Sebastian Vettel
       #16 Charles Leclerc

       Aston Martin Red Bull Racing (Honda)
       #10 Pierre Gasly (Round 1-12) /  #23 Alexander Albon (Rounds 13-)
       #33 Max Verstappen

       Renault F1 Team (Renault)
       #3 Daniel Ricciardo
       #27 Nico Hülkenberg

       Rich Energy Haas F1 Team (Ferrari)
       #8 Romain Grosjean
       #20 Kevin Magnussen

       McLaren F1 Team (Renault)
       #4 Lando Norris
       #55 Carlos Sainz Jr.

       SportPesa Racing Point F1 Team (BWT Mercedes)
       #11 Sergio Pérez
       #18 Lance Stroll

       Alfa Romeo Racing (Ferrari)
       #7 Kimi Räikkönen
       #99 Antonio Giovinazzi

       Red Bull Toro Rosso Honda (Honda)
       #23 Alexander Albon (Round 1-12) /  #10 Pierre Gasly (Rounds 13)
       #26 Daniil Kvyat

       ROKiT Williams Racing (Mercedes)
       #63 George Russell
       #88 Robert Kubica

      CALENDAR
      18th February-21st February 2019
       Pre-Season Testing 1 (Circuit de Barcelona-Catalunya, Montmeló)
      26th February-1st March 2019
       Pre-Season Testing 2 (Circuit de Barcelona-Catalunya, Montmeló)
      17th March 2019
       Round 1 - Australian Grand Prix (Melbourne Grand Prix Circuit, Melbourne)
      31st March 2019
       Round 2- Bahrain Grand Prix (Bahrain International Circuit, Sakhir)
      14th April 2019
       Round 3 - Chinese Grand Prix (Shanghai International Circuit, Shanghai)
      28th April 2019
       Round 4 - Azerbaijan Grand Prix (Baku City Circuit, Baku)
      12th May 2019
       Round 5 - Spanish Grand Prix (Circuit de Barcelona-Catalunya, Montmeló)
      26th May 2019
       Round 6 - Monaco Grand Prix (Circuit de Monaco, Monte Carlo)
      9th June 2019
      Round 7 - Canadian Grand Prix (Circuit Gilles Villeneuve, Montreal)
      23rd June 2019
       Round 8 - French Grand Prix (Circuit Paul Ricard, Le Castellet) 
      30th June 2019
       Round 9 - Austrian Grand Prix (Red Bull Ring, Spielberg)
      14th July 2019
       Round 10 - British Grand Prix (Silverstone Circuit, Silverstone)
      28th July 2019
       Round 11 - German Grand Prix (Hockenheimring, Hockenheim)
      4th August 2019
       Round 12- Hungarian Grand Prix (Hungaroring, Mogyoród)
      1st September 2019
       Round 13 - Belgian Grand Prix (Circuit de Spa-Francorchamps, Stavelot)
      8th September 2019
       Round 14 - Italian Grand Prix (Autodromo Nazionale Monza, Monza)
      22nd September 2019
       Round 15 - Singapore Grand Prix (Marina Bay Street Circuit, Singapore)
      29th September 2019
       Round 16- Russian Grand Prix (Sochi Autodrom, Sochi)
      13th October 2019
       Round 17 - Japanese Grand Prix (Suzuka International Race Course, Suzuka)
      27th October 2019
       Round 18 - Mexican Grand Prix (Autódromo Hermanos Rodríguez, Mexico City)
      3rd November 2019
       Round 19 - United States Grand Prix (Circuit of the Americas, Austin, Texas)
      17th November 2019
       Round 20 - Brazilian Grand Prix (Autódromo José Carlos Pace, São Paulo)
      1st December 2019
       Round 21 - Abu Dhabi Grand Prix (Yas Marina Circuit, Abu Dhabi)

      DRIVER SAFETY:
      The FIA introduced a new standard for driver helmets designed to improve safety. Under the new standard, helmets will be subjected to a more thorough range of crash tests aimed at improving energy absorption and deflection as well as reducing the likelihood of objects penetrating the helmet's structure. All certified helmet manufacturers were required to pass the tests in advance of the 2019 championship to have their certification renewed. Once introduced to Formula One, the new standard will gradually be applied to all helmets used by competitors in every FIA-sanctioned event. TECHNICAL REGULATION CHANGES:
      In a bid to improve overtaking, teams agreed to a series of aerodynamic changes that affect the profile of the front and rear wings. The front wing endplates were reshaped to alter the airflow across the car and reduce the effects of aerodynamic turbulence and winglets above the main plane of the front wing have been banned. The slot in the rear wing was widened, making the drag reduction system (DRS) more powerful. The agreed-upon changes were drawn from the findings of a working group set up to investigate potential changes to the technical regulations in preparation for the 2021 championship.
      Parts of the technical regulations governing bodywork were rewritten in a bid to promote sponsorship opportunities for teams. The agreed changes are to mandate smaller bargeboards and limit aerodynamic development of the rear wing endplates to create more space for sponsor logos. The changes were introduced as a response to falling revenues amid teams and the struggles of smaller teams to secure new sponsors.
      The mandated maximum fuel levels were raised from 105 kg (231 lb) to 110 kg (240 lb) so as to minimise the need for drivers to conserve fuel during a race. Driver weights are no longer considered when measuring the minimum weight of the car. This change was agreed to following concerns that drivers were being forced to lose dangerous amounts of weight in order to offset the additional weight of the post-2014 generation of turbo-hybrid engines. Drivers who weigh less than 80 kg (180 lb) will have to make up this weight with ballast, located around the seat to minimise possible performance gains. The changes were introduced to eliminate the advantage drivers with a naturally-smaller body shape had over taller and heavier drivers, and to discourage unhealthy diet and exercise regimes to improve performance.
      Tyre supplier Pirelli renamed its range of tyres following a request from the FIA and the sport's management. The governing body argued that the naming conventions used in 2018 were obtuse and difficult for casual spectators to understand. Under the new plan, names given to particular compounds, such as "hypersoft" and "ultrasoft", will be replaced by referring during each race to the three compounds teams have available for that race as soft, medium and hard. This is hoped to aid fans understanding the tyre compounds used at each round. The actual compounds for the season will be referred to by number, from the firmest ("1") to the softest ("5"). Pirelli will continue to decide which three compounds are made available for each race. The practice of using colours to identify the specific compound (such as pink for the hypersoft) will be discontinued, with white, yellow and red being used for the three compounds available for each race where white denoted the hardest available compound and red the softest. As all five compounds are available in testing there will be slight variations in the details on the tyre sidewalls to distinguish between the different compounds during testing.
      The championship will introduce a bonus point to a driver who sets the fastest race lap, with the constructor of the driver also receiving the point. The point will only be awarded if the driver finishes inside the top ten. This makes 2019 the first time since 1959 that the championship will introduce a bonus point for fastest lap.
    • By Lineker
      Mercedes AMG Petronas Motorsport (Mercedes)
       #44 Lewis Hamilton
       #77 Valtteri Bottas

       Scuderia Ferrari (Ferrari)
       #5 Sebastian Vettel
       #7 Kimi Räikkönen

       Aston Martin Red Bull Racing (Renault, TAG Heuer branded)
       #3 Daniel Ricciardo
       #33 Max Verstappen

       Sahara Force India F1 Team (Mercedes) (ROUND 1-12)
       #11 Sergio Pérez (Round 1-12)
       #31 Esteban Ocon (Round 1-12)

       Williams Martini Racing (Mercedes)
       #18 Lance Stroll
       #35 Sergey Sirotkin

       Renault Sport Formula One Team (Renault)
       #27 Nico Hülkenberg
       #55 Carlos Sainz Jr.

       Scuderia Toro Rosso (Honda)
       #10 Pierre Gasly
       #28 Brendon Hartley

       Haas F1 Team (Ferrari)
       #8 Romain Grosjean
       #20 Kevin Magnussen

       McLaren Formula 1 Team (Renault)
       #2 Stoffel Vandoorne
       #14 Fernando Alonso 

       Alfa Romeo Sauber F1 Team (Ferrari)
       #9 Marcus Ericsson
       #16 Charles Leclerc

       Racing Point Force India F1 Team (Mercedes) (ROUND 13-)
       #11 Sergio Pérez (Round 13-)
       #31 Esteban Ocon (Round 13-)

      CALENDAR
      26th February-1st March 2018
       Pre-Season Testing 1 (Circuit de Barcelona-Catalunya, Barcelona)
      6th-9th March 2018
       Pre-Season Testing 2 (Circuit de Barcelona-Catalunya, Barcelona)
      25th March 2018
       Round 1 - Australian Grand Prix (Melbourne Grand Prix Circuit, Melbourne)
      8th April 2018
       Round 2- Bahrain Grand Prix (Bahrain International Circuit, Sakhir)
      15th April 2018
       Round 3 - Chinese Grand Prix (Shanghai International Circuit, Shanghai)
      29th April 2018
       Round 4 - Azerbaijan Grand Prix (Baku City Circuit, Baku)
      13th May 2018
       Round 5 - Spanish Grand Prix (Circuit de Barcelona-Catalunya, Barcelona)
      27th May 2018
       Round 6 - Monaco Grand Prix (Circuit de Monaco, Monte Carlo)
      10th June 2018
      Round 7 - Canadian Grand Prix (Circuit Gilles Villeneuve, Montreal)
      24th June 2018
       Round 8 - French Grand Prix (Circuit Paul Ricard, Le Castellet) 
      1st July 2018
       Round 9 - Austrian Grand Prix (Red Bull Ring, Spielberg)
      8th July 2018
       Round 10 - British Grand Prix (Silverstone Circuit, Silverstone)
      22nd July 2018
       Round 11 - German Grand Prix (Hockenheimring, Hockenheim)
      29th July 2018
       Round 12- Hungarian Grand Prix (Hungaroring, Budapest)
      26th August 2018
       Round 13 - Belgian Grand Prix (Circuit de Spa-Francorchamps, Stavelot)
      2nd September 2018
       Round 14 - Italian Grand Prix (Autodromo Nazionale Monza, Monza)
      16th September 2018
       Round 15 - Singapore Grand Prix (Marina Bay Street Circuit, Singapore)
      30th September 2018
       Round 16- Russian Grand Prix (Sochi Autodrom, Sochi)
      7th October 2018
       Round 17 - Japanese Grand Prix (Suzuka International Race Course, Suzuka)
      21st October 2018
       Round 18 - United States Grand Prix (Circuit of the Americas, Austin, Texas)
      28th October 2018
       Round 19 - Mexican Grand Prix (Autódromo Hermanos Rodríguez, Mexico City)
      11th November 2018
       Round 20 - Brazilian Grand Prix (Autódromo José Carlos Pace, São Paulo)
      25th November 2018
       Round 21 - Abu Dhabi Grand Prix (Yas Marina Circuit, Abu Dhabi)

      DRIVER SAFETY:
      Following a series of serious incidents in open-wheel racing—including the fatal accidents of Henry Surtees and Justin Wilson—in which drivers were struck in the head by debris, the FIA announced plans to introduce additional mandatory cockpit protection with 2018 given as the first year for its introduction. Several solutions were tested, with the final design subject to feedback from teams and drivers. Each design was created to deflect debris away from a driver's head without compromising their visibility or the ability of safety marshals to access the cockpit and extract a driver and their seat in the event of a serious accident or medical emergency, with a series of serious accidents—such as the fatal accidents of Jules Bianchi and Dan Wheldon—recreated to simulate the ability of devices to withstand a serious impact. The FIA ultimately settled on the "halo", a wishbone-shaped frame mounted above and around the driver's head and anchored to the monocoque forward of the cockpit. Once introduced, the halo concept is scheduled to be applied to other open-wheel racing categories including Formula 2 and Formula 3. The FIA revealed plans to allow teams some design freedom in the final version of the halo. Race Director Charlie Whiting noted that the halo would be incorporated into the chassis design from its inception rather than attached once the design was completed.
      SPORTING REGULATION CHANGES:
      The number of pre-season test days will be reduced to seven, while the mid-season test held in Bahrain in 2017 will be moved to Barcelona. The rules governing starting procedures will be changed for 2018, granting race stewards the power to issue penalties for improper race starts even if a driver's start does not trigger the automated detection system. The changes were introduced following a series of incidents throughout 2017; during the Chinese Grand Prix, Sebastian Vettel positioned his car too far across his grid slot to be detected by the detection system; while at the Austrian Grand Prix, Valtteri Bottas's start was called into question for his reaction time despite the detection system recognising it as legal. Drivers will be required to wear gloves containing biometric sensors which record their vital signs in order to better assist marshals and recovery crews in assessing their condition in the event of an accident.
      TECHNICAL REGULATION CHANGES:
      Drivers will be limited to three complete engines (down from four in 2017) for the whole season. Despite protests from several teams, the FIA decided to implement the rule for 2018. The FIA banned the use of "shark fins", a carbon-fibre extension to the engine cowling aimed at directing airflow over the rear wing. The use of "T-wings", a horizontal secondary wing mounted forward of and above the rear wing, will be banned. The FIA will introduce further restrictions against the practice of oil burning, where engine oils are burned as fuel to boost performance. The practice, which was first used in 2017 saw teams burning as much as 1.2 litres per one hundred kilometres. For the 2018 championship, this figure will be revised down to a maximum of 0.6 litres per one hundred kilometres. Tyre supplier Pirelli will provide teams with two new tyre compounds in 2018. Each of the 2017 compounds will be made softer, with a new "hypersoft" tyre becoming the softest of the seven. A new "superhard" tyre will also be introduced. The hypersoft compound will be marked by a pink sidewall, while the superhard will be orange. The hard compound, which previously used orange markings, will instead become pale blue.
    • By Lineker
      Mercedes AMG Petronas Motorsport (Mercedes)
       #44 Lewis Hamilton
       #77 Valtteri Bottas

       Red Bull Racing (Renault, TAG-Heuer branded)
       #3 Daniel Ricciardo
       #33 Max Verstappen

       Scuderia Ferrari (Ferrari)
       #5 Sebastian Vettel
       #7 Kimi Räikkönen

       Sahara Force India F1 Team (Mercedes)
       #11 Sergio Pérez
       #31 Esteban Ocon

       Williams Martini Racing (Mercedes)
       #18 Lance Stroll
       #19 Felipe Massa (Rounds 1-10, 12-) /  #40 Paul di Resta (Round 11)

       McLaren Honda Formula 1 Team (Honda)
       #2 Stoffel Vandoorne
       #14 Fernando Alonso (Rounds 1-5, 7-) /  #22 Jenson Button (Round 6)

       Scuderia Toro Rosso (Renault)
       #26 Daniil Kvyat (Rounds 1-14, 17) /  #10 Pierre Gasly (Round 15-16) /  #28 Brendon Hartley (Round 18-20)
       #55 Carlos Sainz Jr. (Round 1-16) /  #39 Brendon Hartley (Round 17) /  #10 Pierre Gasly (Round 18-20)

       Haas F1 Team (Ferrari)
       #8 Romain Grosjean
       #20 Kevin Magnussen

       Renault Sport Formula One Team (Renault)
       #27 Nico Hülkenberg
       #30 Jolyon Palmer (Round 1-16) /  #55 Carlos Sainz Jr. (Round 17-)

       Sauber F1 Team (Ferrari 061 (2016-spec))
       #9 Marcus Ericsson
       #36 Antonio Giovinazzi (Round 1-2) /  #94 Pascal Wehrlein (Round 3-)

      CALENDAR
      27th February-2nd March 2017
      Pre-Season Testing 1 (Circuit de Barcelona-Catalunya, Barcelona)
      7th-10th March 2017
       Pre-Season Testing 2 (Circuit de Barcelona-Catalunya, Barcelona)
      26th March 2017
       Round 1 - Australian Grand Prix (Melbourne Grand Prix Circuit, Melbourne)
      9th April 2017
       Round 2 - Chinese Grand Prix (Shanghai International Circuit, Shanghai)
      16th April 2017
       Round 3 - Bahrain Grand Prix (Bahrain International Circuit, Sakhir)
      30th April 2017
       Round 4 - Russian Grand Prix (Sochi Autodrom, Sochi)
      14th May 2017
       Round 5 - Spanish Grand Prix (Circuit de Barcelona-Catalunya, Barcelona)
      28th May 2017
       Round 6 - Monaco Grand Prix (Circuit de Monaco, Monte Carlo)
      11th June 2017
      Round 7 - Canadian Grand Prix (Circuit Gilles Villeneuve, Montreal)
      25th June 2017
       Round 8 - Azerbaijan Grand Prix (Baku City Circuit, Baku)
      9th July 2017
       Round 9 - Austrian Grand Prix (Red Bull Ring, Spielberg)
      16th July 2017
       Round 10 - British Grand Prix (Silverstone Circuit, Silverstone)
      30th July 2017
       Round 11 - Hungarian Grand Prix (Hungaroring, Budapest)
      27th August 2017
       Round 12 - Belgian Grand Prix (Circuit de Spa-Francorchamps, Stavelot)
      3rd September 2017
       Round 13 - Italian Grand Prix (Autodromo Nazionale Monza, Monza)
      17th September 2017
       Round 14 - Malaysian Grand Prix (Sepang International Circuit, Kuala Lumpur)
      1st October 2017
       Round 15 - Singapore Grand Prix (Marina Bay Street Circuit, Singapore)
      8th October 2017
       Round 16 - Japanese Grand Prix (Suzuka International Race Course, Suzuka)
      22nd October 2017
       Round 17 - United States Grand Prix (Circuit of the Americas, Austin, Texas)
      29th October 2017
       Round 18 - Mexican Grand Prix (Autódromo Hermanos Rodríguez, Mexico City)
      12th November 2017
       Round 19 - Brazilian Grand Prix (Autódromo José Carlos Pace, São Paulo)
      26th November 2017
       Round 20 - Abu Dhabi Grand Prix (Yas Marina Circuit, Abu Dhabi)

      GENERAL CHANGES:
      In September 2016, Liberty Media purchased a minority stake in the sport from CVC Capital Partners ahead of a hoped-for full buyout in time for the 2017 season. As part of the deal, the sport adopted a model similar to that used by the US National Football League and Major League Baseball, with teams entitled to purchase a stake in the sport As a response to widespread changes in the technical regulations expected to increase cornering speeds by up to 40 km/h (24.9 mph), the FIA requested that every circuit on the calendar undergo revisions to update safety features.
      TECHNICAL REGULATION CHANGES:
      The technical regulations governing bodywork design were revised for 2017, with the objective of improving lap times by four to five seconds over the 2016 generation of cars. These changes include: An increase of the width of the front wing to 1,800 mm (70.9 in). Lowering the rear wing by 150 mm (5.9 in) and moving its position back by 200 mm (7.9 in). The leading edge of the barge boards being brought forward to allow teams more freedom in controlling airflow. An increase of the width of the front and rear tyres to allow cars to generate more mechanical grip. The minimum weight of the car including the driver being raised by 20 kg to 722 kg, with teams allowed to use 105 kg of fuel to account for the increase in minimum weight. The token system used to regulate power unit development — where the power unit was divided into individual areas, and each area assigned a points value with development of these areas deducting points from a manufacturer's overall points quota — will be abandoned. Restrictions are to be placed on the dimensions, weight and the materials used to build each individual component of the power unit. Teams are restricted to four power units per season regardless of the number of Grands Prix in the season. Previous seasons had included a provision for a fifth power unit if the number of Grands Prix in a season exceeded 20; from 2017, this provision is to be abandoned. The cost of a power unit supply is reduced by €1 million in 2017 ahead of a further reduction in 2018. Cameras will no longer be permitted to be mounted on stalks, located on the nose of the car.
      SPORTING REGULATION CHANGES:
      Under rules introduced in 2015, grid penalties for exceeding a driver's quota of power unit components carried over from one race to the next if the penalty could not be fully served when issued. When this carry-over system was abandoned, teams could build up a reserve of spare components by introducing several at once while only serving a single grid penalty. From 2017, teams will only be able to use one new component over their quota per race, with any additional components incurring further penalties. This change prevents teams from "stockpiling" spare power unit components. Power unit suppliers will have an "obligation to supply", mandating that they supply power units to any team, should a team end up without an agreement. The rule was introduced following the breakdown in the relationship between Renault and their customer teams Red Bull Racing and Scuderia Toro Rosso at the end of the 2015 season that left both teams in limbo until deals could be arranged. In the event that a race is declared wet and must start behind the safety car, the grid will follow normal starting procedures once conditions are declared satisfactory for racing. Drivers will line up on the grid for a standing start once the safety car pulls into pit lane, although any laps completed behind the safety car will count towards the total race distance.
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.


×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. To learn more, see our Privacy Policy